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Why Take Multi from A to Z

Vitamin A
Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin with four major functions in the body:

  1. It helps cells reproduce normally.
  2. It is required for vision; vitamin A maintains healthy cells in various structures of the eye.
  3. It is required for normal growth and development of the embryo and fetus, influencing genes.
  4. It may be required for normal reproductive function, with influences on the function and development of sperm, ovaries and placenta.

Vitamin B's

B1: Vitamin B1 is is a water-soluble vitamin needed to process carbohydrates, fat, and protein. Every cell of the body requires vitamin B1 to form the fuel the body runs on-adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Nerve cells require vitamin B1 in order to function normally


Progressive Active Men/WomenB12: Vitamin B12 is is a water-soluble vitamin needed for normal nerve cell activity, DNA replication, and production of the mood-affecting substance SAMe (S-adenosyl-L-methionine). Vitamin B12 acts with folic acid and vitamin b6 to control homocysteine levels By definition, all people with pernicious anemia are vitamin B12-deficient .Older people with urinary incontinence4 and hearing loss5 have been reported to be at increased risk of B12 deficiency.

B2: Vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin needed to process amino acids and fats, activate vitamin B6 and folic acid, and help convert carbohydrates into the fuel the body runs on-adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Under some conditions, vitamin B2 can act as an antioxidant

B3: The body uses the water-soluble vitamin B3 in the process of releasing energy from carbohydrates. It is needed to form fat from carbohydrates and to process alcohol. The niacin form of vitamin B3 also regulates cholesterol, though niacinamide does not. The best food sources of vitamin
are peanuts, brewer's yeast, fish, and meat. Some vitamin B3 is also found in whole grains.

B5: Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin involved in the Kreb's cycle of energy production and is needed to make the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is also essential in producing, transporting, and releasing energy from fats. Synthesis of cholesterol (needed to manufacture vitamin D and steroid hormones) depends on pantothenic acid. Pantothenic acid also activates the adrenal glands.1 Pantethine-a byproduct of pantothenic acid-has been reported to lower blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

B6: Vitamin B6 is the master vitamin for processing amino acids-the building blocks of all proteins and some hormones. Vitamin B6 helps to make and take apart many amino acids and is also needed to make the hormones, serotonin, melatonin, and dopamine. Also acts as a natural diuretic

B9: A.K.A. Folic acid, is a B vitamin needed for cell replication and growth. Folic acid helps form building blocks of DNA, the body's genetic information, and building blocks of RNA, needed for protein synthesis in all cells. Therefore, rapidly growing tissues, such as those of a fetus, and rapidly regenerating cells, like red blood cells and immune cells, have a high need for folic acid. Deficiency results in a form of anemia that responds quickly to folic acid supplementation.

Biotin Biotin, a water-soluble B vitamin, acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of protein, fats, and carbohydrates. Good dietary sources of biotin include organ meats, oatmeal, egg yolk, soy, mushrooms, bananas, peanuts, and brewer's yeast. Bacteria in the intestine also produce significant amounts of biotin, but evidence is conflicting as to whether biotin produced by intestinal bacteria is present at a location or is in a form that permits significant absorption by the body.

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Vitamin C
Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin. Unlike most mammals, humans do not have the ability to make their own vitamin C. Therefore, we must obtain vitamin C through our diet. Vitamin C is required for the synthesis of collagen, an important structural component of blood vessels, tendons, ligaments, and bone. Vitamin C also plays an important role in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter, norepinephrine. Neurotransmitters are critical to brain function and are known to affect mood. In addition, vitamin C is required for the synthesis of carnitine, a small molecule that is essential for the transport of fat to cellular organelles called mitochondria, for conversion to energy. Its also an antioxidant, destroying free radical formation, especially for smokers who deplete themselves of Vitamin C on a daily basis. Read MORE.

Calcium is the most abundant, essential mineral in the human body. Of the two to three pounds of calcium contained in the average body, 99% is located in the bones and teeth. Calcium is needed to form bones and teeth and is also required for blood clotting, transmission of signals in nerve cells, and muscle contraction. The importance of calcium for preventing osteoporosis is probably its most well-known role.

Chromium is an essential trace mineral that helps the body maintain normal blood sugar levels. The best source of chromium is true brewer's yeast. Nutritional yeast and torula yeast do not contain significant amounts of chromium and are not suitable substitutes for brewer's yeast. Chromium is also found in grains and cereals, though much of it is lost when these foods are refined. Vitamin C increases the absorption of chromium. Read MORE.

Vitamin D
 Vitamin D is found in numerous dietary sources such as fish, eggs, fortified milk, and cod liver oil. The sun is also a significant contributor to our daily production of vitamin D, and as little as 10 minutes of exposure is thought to be enough to prevent deficiencies The major biologic function of vitamin D is to maintain normal blood levels of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain bones. Recently, research also suggests vitamin D may provide protection from osteoporosis, hypertension, cancer, and several autoimmune diseases. Read MORE.

Vitamin E
Vitamin E is an antioxidant that protects cell membranes and other fat-soluble parts of the body, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL; "bad" cholesterol) cholesterol, from damage. Wheat germ oil, nuts and seeds, whole grains, egg yolks, and leafy green vegetables all contain vitamin E. Certain vegetable oils should contain significant amounts of vitamin E. However, many of the vegetable oils sold in supermarkets have had the vitamin E removed in processing. The high amounts found in supplements, often 100 to 800 IU per day, are not obtainable from eating food. Read MORE.

Iodine is a trace mineral needed to make thyroid hormones, which are necessary for maintaining normal metabolism in all cells of the body. Seafood, iodized salt, and sea vegetables-for example, kelp-are high in iodine. Processed food may contain added iodized salt. Iodine is frequently found in dairy products. Vegetables grown in iodine-rich soil also contain this mineral.

Iron is an essential mineral. It is part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of the blood. Iron-deficient people tire easily in part because their bodies are starved for oxygen. Iron is also part of myoglobin, which helps muscle cells store oxygen. Without enough iron, adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the fuel the body runs on) cannot be properly synthesized. As a result, some iron-deficient people become fatigued even when their hemoglobin levels are normal (i.e., when they are not anemic).The most absorbable form of iron, called "heme" iron, is found in oysters, meat and poultry, and fish. Non-heme iron is also found in these foods, as well as in dried fruit, molasses, leafy green vegetables, wine, and iron supplements. Acidic foods (such as tomato sauce) cooked in an iron pan can also be a source of dietary iron.

Lipotropic Factors
Our blood contains certain constituents known as lipotropic factors. In addition to playing important roles in the mobilization and utilization of dietary fats, lipotropic factors act as the body's natural emulsifiers, holding limiting fats within the blood and resisting fat and cholesterol deposits within the cardiovascular system. Sufficient lipotropic factors can also keep homocysteine levels in check to support cardiovascular health, including the health of the arterial walls and blood lipids. The body is able to synthesize it's own lipotropic factors when given all the ingredients: choline, inositol,methonine betaine, folic acid and B vitamins

Lycopene, found primarily in tomatoes, is a member of the carotenoid family-which includes beta-carotene and similar compounds found naturally in food-and has potent antioxidant capabilities.

Magnesium is an essential mineral to the human body. It is needed for bone, protein, and fatty acid formation, making new cells, activating B vitamins, relaxing muscles, clotting blood, and forming adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the energy the body runs on). The secretion and action of insulin also require magnesium.

Manganese is an essential trace mineral needed for healthy skin, bone, and cartilage formation, as well as glucose tolerance. It also helps activate superoxide dismutase (SOD)-an important antioxidant enzyme. Nuts and seeds, wheat germ, wheat bran, leafy green vegetables, beet tops, tea, and pineapple are all good sources of manganese.

Molybdenum is an essential trace mineral needed for the proper function of certain enzyme-dependent processes, including the metabolism of iron. The amount of molybdenum in plant foods varies significantly and is dependent upon the mineral content of the soil. The best sources of this mineral are beans, dark green leafy vegetables, and grains. Hard tap water can also supply molybdenum to the diet.

Potassium is an essential mineral needed to regulate water balance, levels of acidity, blood pressure, and neuromuscular function. This mineral also plays a critical role in the transmission of electrical impulses in the heart. Most fruits are excellent sources of potassium. Beans, milk, and vegetables contain significant amounts of potassium.

While most people probably don't take in enough selenium, gross deficiencies are rare in Western countries. Soils in some areas are selenium-deficient and people who eat foods grown primarily on selenium-poor soils are at risk for deficiency. There is an association between heart disease and depleted levels of selenium. People who are deficient in selenium have an increased risk of developing certain types of rheumatoid arthritis. Selenium enhances the antioxidant effect of vitamin E. Selenium also helps with pre-menstrual syndrome for women, and increased fertility in men.

Vanadium is an ultra-trace mineral found in the human diet and the human body. It is essential for some animals. Deficiency symptoms in these animals include growth retardation, bone deformities, and infertility. However, vanadium has not been proven to be an essential mineral for humans. Vanadium is found in very small amounts in a wide variety of foods, including seafood, cereals, mushrooms, parsley, corn, soy, and gelatin.

Zinc is an essential mineral that is a component of more than 300 enzymes needed to repair wounds, maintain fertility in adults and growth in children, synthesize protein, help cells reproduce, preserve vision, boost immunity, and protect against free radicals, among other functions .Good sources of zinc include oysters, meat, eggs, seafood, black-eyed peas, tofu, and wheat germ. The average diet frequently provides less than the Recommended Dietary Allowance for zinc, particularly in vegetarians a low-potency supplement (15-30 mg per day) can fill in dietary gaps. Read MORE.

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